Technology Legislation | Twenty of Time

Technology Legislation

Unjust technology legislation

There are quite a few technology-focused laws that don't make a lot of sense. In this series, I investigated these laws, their motivation and consequences. Along the way we find many examples of public protest and backtracking politicians. Unfortunately, we're still left with the bothersome consequences.

Everyone is presumed guilty

Part 1 dives into the older technology legislations, from the 1986 U.S. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act to the 2001 U.S. Patriot Act. We explore the consequences of these laws and whether they reached the desired effect.

Unjust Technology Legislation I
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Everyone is presumed guilty

Corporate and government interests dismiss human rights
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The public reaction

Part 2 is a bit more uplifting. The technology laws are still terrible, but public action is a new factor. For many of these, the internet population became very visible by blacking out websites in protest, writing legislators and organising physical protests.

Unjust Technology Legislation II
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The public reaction

The continued undermining of a fundamental human right
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Analysis of Article 13

Part 3 discusses the upcoming Article 13, which unfortunately has passed legislative checks. Article 13 introduces upload filters on user-uploaded content, which in practice leads to heavy content moderation of legally allowed use of copyrighted work. How did this idea come to be? I dove into the law, the public consultations and drew my conclusion from that.

New privacy law

The General Data Protection Regulation is an innovative privacy law that you may've heard of. What does this law mean and what rights do EU citizens get?

EU privacy regulation
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GDPR: impact of the new European privacy law

Exploring the influence of user rights as defined in the GDPR
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Just click accept

About every website has a cookie banner nowadays. They pretend to care about privacy and only give you the option to accept tracking. Why are they there and why are they ineffective? The EU 'cookie law' holds the answer.